Essential Reads

Interest of Conflict

By Joachim I Krueger Ph.D. on November 23, 2017 in One Among Many
When you are disrespected, do you nip the bud or let it flourish?

Describing Sexual Assault in a Language Men Can Understand

By Melissa Burkley Ph.D. on November 21, 2017 in The Social Thinker
Female victims' sexual assault stories often fail to resonate with men. But Terry Crews describes his experience in terms with which men can empathize.

The Best Way to Counteract Rude Behavior

Whether they intend to or not, people may at times behave rudely. A new study on incivility’s effects shows why rudeness hurts so much and how you can negate its effects on you.

Why People Who Have Less Give More

By Utpal Dholakia on November 20, 2017 in The Science Behind Behavior
Every one of us can learn valuable lessons from the generosity and compassion of the poor.

More Posts on Social Life

Beware Handsome Strangers: When Online Suitors Are Scammers

By Wendy L. Patrick, Ph.D. on November 23, 2017 in Why Bad Looks Good
Social media is a convenient, rewarding way to keep up with existing relationships, and form new ones. This is also why it is such an attractive tool for criminals.

52 Ways: Learn How to Deal with People Toxic to Your Couple

By Roni Beth Tower Ph.D., ABPP on November 23, 2017 in Life, Refracted
After you identify a third-party threat to your couple, you can take several actions to limit current and prevent future damage. Many describe expressing love to the third-party.

Holiday Decorating is Good for the Soul

The beauty of holiday decorating, though, is that your way – no matter what it is – is the right way for you and your traditions
CC0 Creative Commons; Free for commercial use; No attribution required

It Depends

By Tim Carey Ph.D. on November 22, 2017 in In Control
We always make decisions relative to other decisions we could have made or different goals we could have achieved.

The Writer's Laboratory #1: Intro to a New Blog Series

By Melissa Burkley Ph.D. on November 22, 2017 in The Social Thinker
The Writer's Laboratory combine two passions—psychology and writing fiction—in a way that teaches others how to become more honest (and therefore better) writers

Navigating the Holidays

Holiday gatherings are a mixture of joy and stress. People planning can reduce stress and increase joy.

Face Time: What Expression Makes the Best First Impression?

By Wendy L. Patrick, Ph.D. on November 20, 2017 in Why Bad Looks Good
We size each other up quickly, based on what we see. A happy face is noticeable, memorable, and creates positive emotion—which enhances the perception of authenticity.

The Psychology of Gift Giving

By Neel Burton M.D. on November 19, 2017 in Hide and Seek
...and 10 rules for better gifts.

Beyond Reality: Pretend Play Matters

By Brittany N Thompson on November 18, 2017 in Socioemotional Success
What is pretend play? How does pretend contribute to social skill development? What does all of this mean for everyday contexts and interactions for young children?

How to Spot the Stalker: When Casual Dating is Dangerous

By Wendy L. Patrick, Ph.D. on November 18, 2017 in Why Bad Looks Good
How many dates does it take to form a relationship? Stalkers might say one — or none. The distorted lens of unrequited love can be delusional and dangerous.

Reducing Host-Guest Tensions: How to Be a Good Houseguest

By Shawn M. Burn Ph.D. on November 17, 2017 in Presence of Mind
These houseguest guidelines will increase the odds of a visit unmarked by host-guest tensions.

Five Ways to Remain Calm This Holiday Season

By Azadeh Aalai Ph.D. on November 17, 2017 in The First Impression
Is it possible to get the joy out of the holiday season without the added stress and anxiety?

Lidia Yuknavitch's Love Letter to Fellow Misfits

By Jennifer Haupt on November 16, 2017 in One True Thing
Some of us manage to invent bodies, voices, and lives worth living even though we don’t fit in to the normative socius.

Five Ways to Practice Gratitude

Need a gratitude boost this holiday season? Try these five gratitude practices.

A Farewell to Skepticism

By Joachim I Krueger Ph.D. on November 16, 2017 in One Among Many
Keep theological hypotheses out of science.

Generating Energy to Be Kind

By Mica B. Estrada, Ph.D. on November 16, 2017 in Lead with Kindness
Do you have enough energy to be kind today? Wisdom and science show how personal reflection empowers us to be our best self.

Calling Out Sick From Work? Why You May Want to Unplug Too

By Sue Scheff on November 16, 2017 in Shame Nation
A new survey explains how almost half of employees are caught in lies on social media when they call out sick and some are finding themselves on the unemployment line.
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Making Better Bureaucrats

By Glenn C. Altschuler Ph.D. on November 15, 2017 in This Is America
Often deemed rule-obsessed, callous, petty, power-trippers, bureaucrats strive to satisfy the impossible expectations we have of them. They deserve our respect.

Managing Diabetes in Festive Times

Are you worried about managing your Type 2 diabetes as the holidays approach? Are you anxious about going to social gatherings? Talking about your concerns and planning can help.

A Face in the Crowd: What Type of People Are Most Memorable?

By Wendy L. Patrick, Ph.D. on November 13, 2017 in Why Bad Looks Good
Ever wonder why certain people stand out in your mind? What is it about them that makes them so unforgettable? The answer likely has more to do with you.

Mass Public Shootings Are on the Rise

By Scott A. Bonn Ph.D. on November 13, 2017 in Wicked Deeds
There are powerful social forces today that promote mass murder, including financial fears, distrust of government, prejudice and racism, terrorism and constant war.

The Myth of the Self-Made Individual

We should be wary of those who claim to be self-made, who tout themselves as the emblems of accomplishment. These prominent people simply disregard the support they’ve had.

The Paradox of "In Here" and "Out There"

It seems that, at least in the academic realm, the "objective" reality does not have to "prove" anything. It simply is. Accepted as it is—as The Truth.

Mass Shootings, Compassion Fatigue (or Why I Stopped Caring)

By Michael Ungar Ph.D. on November 12, 2017 in Nurturing Resilience
How do we not feel helpless, or worse, blame the victims of mass shootings for the violence that killed them? Emotional numbness grows when we lack control. There are solutions.

The Costs of Vanity

By Richard Smith Ph.D. on November 11, 2017 in Joy and Pain
An unappreciated cost of vanity is that our concern over maintaining a desired social image can lead us to do things which bring us harm.

Tired of Feeling Divided?

By Peter T. Coleman Ph.D. on November 09, 2017 in The Five Percent
If you are tired of the dysfunction shackling our country and interested in promoting reasonable conversations with citizens from the other side, here are a few pointers.

Stern

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on November 09, 2017 in How To Do Life
A short-short story about people’s veneer.

American Bigotry: Now It’s Personal

By Rupert W Nacoste Ph.D. on November 09, 2017 in A Quiet Revolution
Today we are seeing the panic that results when a sense of group superiority is no longer supported by legal social structures.

Insecurity May Enhance Your Ability to Detect Dishonesty

By Wendy L. Patrick, Ph.D. on November 09, 2017 in Why Bad Looks Good
Insecurity is related to the ability to detect dishonesty. Your suspicions about your partner´s dishonesty may reveal the honest truth about you.

When an Open Book is Fiction: Detecting Dishonesty on a Date

By Wendy L. Patrick, Ph.D. on November 08, 2017 in Why Bad Looks Good
As much as you want to take the plunge of trust, don´t believe everything you hear. Pacing, presentation, and pauses provide several ways to detect deception.