Essential Reads

Move Over, Gray Matter—White Matter Is Taking Center Stage

By Christopher Bergland on October 17, 2017 in The Athlete's Way
One of the largest studies of white matter (which enables communication between brain regions) ever was published today by scientists from the University of Southern California.

Stress Makes It Harder to Recognize Danger

By Lydia Denworth on October 16, 2017 in Brain Waves
Sometimes stress heightens our awareness, but more often, it dulls our ability to respond to new threats. Recognizing the risk and reducing sources of stress can help.

Vagus Nerve Facilitates Guts, Wits, and Grace Under Pressure

By Christopher Bergland on October 15, 2017 in The Athlete's Way
There are dozens of easy ways to engage your vagus nerve that can inhibit "fight, flight, or freeze" stress responses, lower anxiety, and give you enough guts to seize the day.

Unraveling the Teenage Mind

Adolescence can be a mystifying time for everyone. This new book can help.

More Posts on Neuroscience

Why Do Dogs Have Cold, Wet Noses?

A dog's wet nose can improve his scenting ability but it also does more than that.

The Loneliest Neuron

By Mark D. Humphries Ph.D. on October 17, 2017 in Neural Processing
Why doesn't every neuron know about every thing?

Nessa's Sense of Machines

By Maureen Seaberg on October 16, 2017 in Sensorium
Through history, people have strongly related to the inanimate. But in this generation, that's machines.

Consciousness: How a Squishy Brain Connects to Make You, You

By Marc Bekoff Ph.D. on October 15, 2017 in Animal Emotions
How do 90 billion neurons interconnect to produce a wide variety of experiences? Your Conscious Mind, a new book for a general audience, covers what we know about consciousness.

Strange Sound Sickening Cuban Diplomats? Don’t Believe It.

By Robert Bartholomew Ph.D. on October 14, 2017 in It's Catching
Mysterious "sonic attacks" on U.S. diplomats in Cuba are mass hysteria.

Enhancing Athletic Performance With Brain Stimulation

New research shows that transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) improves endurance performance and decreases perceived exertion among cyclists.

Does Raising a Dog's Excitement Level Improve Performance?

Attempting to generate higher levels of motivation and excitement may be detrimental to the performance of some dogs based upon their personality or temperament.

Risk, Fear, and the Rise of Demagogues

By George Michelsen Foy on October 11, 2017 in Shut Up and Listen!
Politicians have traditionally appealed to our fight-or-flight reflex to save their political bacon. Donald Trump looks set to do the same.

Self-Soothing Skills Learned in Childhood

Here are some curious childhood stress relievers that will help you identify your own. Your early habits are pathways in your brain that you can build onto today.

When You Love or Hate An Addict You Can Recover, Too

"Talking to a loved one before it's too late could make such a difference and prevent decades of unnecessary malevolence toward a person who cannot help himself."

How to Train Your Brain to Think Differently

Studies show you can physically change your brain by changing the way you think. Here are three strategies that will train your brain to think differently.

How to Deal with Takers at Work

Are you struggling to deal with someone whose only interest is to take from others so they can make themselves look better? What’s the best way to deal with a taker at work?

What to Do When Doctors Haven't Helped You

By Eric Haseltine Ph.D. on October 09, 2017 in Long Fuse, Big Bang
A new approach when the old ones fail.

Can You Take A Moment?

By Rick Hanson Ph.D. on October 09, 2017 in Your Wise Brain
Stop the urgency of the day and let a quiet fill the air let your thoughts slow down. There is presence in this moment, and no worries about the future.

Our Search for Meaning Produces Universal Neural Signatures

By Christopher Bergland on October 07, 2017 in The Athlete's Way
A pioneering new fMRI brain imaging study from USC illuminates our human commonality and the universality of our search for meaning in the stories we read.

What's in a Number?

What does a measure of IQ actually tell us about a person?

Nature Versus Nurture: Where We Are in 2017

A lot has changed in our understanding of the timeless nature-nurture debate. Find out where we are now.

Anxiety Springs Eternal

By Nigel Barber Ph.D. on October 05, 2017 in The Human Beast
Anxiety is the unsolvable problem that gives rise to many others, from addiction and suicide to depression, obesity, and economic failure.

Ignoring Biological Bases of Senseless Violence

By Stephen Greenspan Ph.D. on October 05, 2017 in Incompetence
Although much is today know about brain-behavior relationships, commentators on the Las Vegas tragedy have generally failed to ask whether the shooter's brain was abnormal.

Say Something, I’m Giving Up On You

By Sara Gluck, PhD, LCSW on October 04, 2017 in Do Your Own Think
If you love someone who has survived the burning flames of physical or emotional abuse, he or she may need your help in order to learn how to trust again.

How to Heal from Unspeakable Terror

The latest neuroscience research suggests we can help people heal from trauma's emotional scars.

Why Is a Dog Combative and Aggressive toward Other Dogs?

Recent research shows that the balance between two common hormones may account for aggressive behaviors in some dogs.

7 Steps To Go From Dysregulated Emotions To Clear Thinking

By Grant H. Brenner M.D. on October 03, 2017 in ExperiMentations
When distressing experience triggers emotional instability, it can be challenging to get back on track. The TARGET model provides a seven step approach to use when overwhelmed.

How Microbes In Our Gut Can Affect Our Emotions

Gene-regulating molecules in the brain are under the influence.

Can a Strengths Coaching Approach Be Damaging?

While focusing on your strengths has been found to have all sorts of benefits, could ignoring your weaknesses come at a cost?

Controlling Your Emotions

By James E. Crum, II on October 02, 2017 in The Executive Brain
Can we control our emotions? Here's how.

What Causes Brain Zaps?

Brain zaps can be an unbearable side-effect of discontinuing an antidepressant. Although these brain shocks are often described as harmless, they may in fact be minor seizures.

Surprising New Discoveries About Our Sense of Smell

New research shows that human smell can detect serious diseases.

Today the Disease Theory Is Argued in Court

By Stanton Peele Ph.D. on October 02, 2017 in Addiction in Society
The Massachusetts Supreme Court commences today deciding whether addiction is a disease that removes the capacity to choose. What would be its implications for decriminalization?

The Vegan Brain

By Georgia Ede MD on September 30, 2017 in Diagnosis: Diet
What everyone needs to know to keep their brains in tip-top shape.