Essential Reads

Remembering Accidentally on Purpose

It's a well-known, unfortunate fact of life that some of our memory functions decline as we age, but recent studies suggest there may be a silver lining to that gray cloud.

Your Memories Make You Who You Are

Don't worry if can't remember the details of your first kiss that well. Your unconscious does it for you.
Volha_R/Shutterstock

You Really Need to Be Tracking Your Dreams

By Patrick McNamara Ph.D. on August 01, 2017 in Dream Catcher
Recording and working with your dreams on a regular basis may allow you to better predict your illnesses, cultivate your creativity and improve your daily social interactions.

Never Again Forget a Name With This Proven Method

Everyone wishes to have a better memory for faces, but so far there's been no magic bullet. A new study based on a popular game shows how to make that magic work for you.

More Posts on Memory

What Your Earliest Food Memories Say About You

Memories of food associated with growing up influence you in ways you never realized. New research shows the role that food memory plays in adapting to adult life.

Is Your Brain Older Than You Are?

By William R. Klemm Ph.D. on August 15, 2017 in Memory Medic
Memory loss is a main symptom of excessive brain aging that we can all notice.

First Memories

Like a child who uses a blanket to self-soothe, a memory may be a psychological mechanism awakened at certain moments to protect us from hopelessness.

How Over-Learning can Solidify a Skill

Can practicing a skill beyond the point of mastery solidify it in memory? Study suggests it can, and that neural inhibition might prevent interference by another task.

Criticizing a Saint Part 2

Revisiting the decision not to interview Viktor Frankl.

Glen Campbell’s Farewell Tour, Accompanied by Alzheimer’s

By Dean Olsher MA, MT-BC on August 09, 2017 in A Sound Mind
"Even though Campbell cannot recognize himself in a home movie from his younger days, he is still able to deploy his exquisite singing voice and guitar chops onstage."

Mental Down Time Affects Learning

By William R. Klemm Ph.D. on August 04, 2017 in Memory Medic
"All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy," might be re-framed, "all work and no rest makes Jack a poor learner."

Unimagined Sensitivities—Series Conclusion

By Michael Jawer on August 01, 2017 in Feeling Too Much
Death—and its close relative, trauma—may trigger perceptions that subvert the normal bounds of space and time. The fascinating evidence merits serious investigation.

Focused Distractions? How We Adapt to Multi-Tasking

“Don’t distract me, I am multitasking”: Distractions can be damaging, but even when multi-tasking, we learn how to focus on what is important.

Can Sweet Memories Neutralize Conflict?

When intimate partners fight to win, their conflicts can easily deteriorate into accusations, invalidations, and character assassinations.

Green Tea May Ameliorate Brain Drain Linked to Western Diets

A pioneering new study reports that a compound in green tea (EGCG) may prove to be a therapeutic intervention for diet-related memory impairment and neuroinflammation.

Reminiscing and Contemplating

There is a natural tendency with age to live too much in the past.

How Good Is a Dog's Ability to Remember People?

There are suggestions that dogs can remember and may recognize particular people even after years of separation.

Do Brain-Changing Games Really Work?

By Lydia Denworth on July 14, 2017 in Brain Waves
Want to improve your thinking and memory? Think brain-changing games might help? A new study looked at their effect on the brain, on cognitive performance, and on decision-making.

Promising New Treatment for Depression

By William R. Klemm Ph.D. on July 13, 2017 in Memory Medic
Recent research emphasizes the importance of memory as therapy for depression.

Caution: Memory at Work

By Paula Croxson Ph.D. on July 09, 2017 in Selective Memory
A new study sheds light on how we keep our minds on the task at hand even when faced with the distractions of modern life.

Trauma Nation

By Stanton Peele on July 07, 2017 in Addiction in Society
The cultural movement of recovering trauma is actually a psychological disaster of its own making. The answers—forward planning and community building—are nowhere apparent.

“Memory Athletes” and the Rest of Us

With a specific type of memory training, individuals can alter connections within and between brain networks to resemble connections found in the brains of elite memory athletes.

How Can We Use Our Voices to Show Up More Powerfully?

By Peter Bregman on July 03, 2017 in How We Work
Discover Tracy’s easy exercise for finding your most confident voice, why speaking loudly does not equal speaking with power, and how you can make a vocal change stick.
W. R. Klemm

Memory Training Produces Lasting Effects

By William R. Klemm Ph.D. on July 03, 2017 in Memory Medic
You too can be a memory athlete.

Family Disputes About Memories

Open and validating conversations about disputed family experiences can be an important part of the healing process.
"Yin and Yang" by Klem - This vector image was created with Inkscape by Klem, and then manually edited by Mnmazur.. Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons a/File:Yin_and_Yang.svg

Treatment of Insomnia: Cannabis Reconsidered, Part Three

By John Cline Ph.D. on June 30, 2017 in Sleepless in America
Increasing numbers of patients are using medical marijuana for treatment of their insomnia. Patients need reliable information about what it does and how it works.

The Wisdom of Birds

By Susan Hooper on June 29, 2017 in Detours and Tangents
For three days in June, I watched a pair of robins tend their young. Their devotion to their offspring filled me with admiration and gave me food for thought.

Unimagined Sensitivities, Part 8

By Michael Jawer on June 27, 2017 in Feeling Too Much
Beyond the five senses we humans know, some of the sensory capacities more prominent in other creatures may be intimately connected with health, danger, and emotion generally.

Splitting Your Ex Makes Breakup Recovery That Much Harder

Splitting is the mental magician trick of remembering your ex as only good and impedes breakup recovery. Here are five things to know about splitting to help you move on.

Learning Stuff While Missing the Point

By William R. Klemm Ph.D. on June 20, 2017 in Memory Medic
The best way to remember factoids is the thinking required to understand them.

The Factor That Administers Cognitive Control over Emotions

Some recent research on poor cognitive control and depression has overlooked four issues. This post suggests that it is cognitive understanding of reality that regulates emotions.

Memoirs: Learning Too Late About Our Dad’s Military Life

In writing a memoir about growing up with Italian grandparents, I came to see all the questions we might have asked about our father.

Stop Thinking, Start Being

What frightens people about adding mindfulness or meditation to their lives? Savor the "now" to be able to relish the memory.

Does White Noise Help You Learn?

By William R. Klemm Ph.D. on June 13, 2017 in Memory Medic
How do you promote focus in an environment of distractions?