Essential Reads

Tap Into the Inner Genius You Didn’t Know You Had

Research show that genius is inside each of us, but how can we access it?

Getting Sentimental Could Increase Your Savings

By Brad Klontz Psy.D., CFP on October 12, 2017 in Mind Over Money
How can we harness positive, emotionally charged memories to develop a deeper incentive for saving?

Why People Hold Grudges and What to Do About Them

When people hold grudges against you, it can be painful and confusing. New research shows there’s a reason they act this way. Understanding why may help you feel a bit better.

The Art of Nostalgia

Nostalgia is an aesthetic form of memory, and our relation to our nostalgic memories is much like that of a painter to a work of art.

More Posts on Memory

Candy, Costumes, and Scares. Oh My!

By Shawn M. Burn Ph.D. on October 21, 2017 in Presence of Mind
What's behind people's love for Halloween and wild Halloween behavior?

Why Does Cerebral Brain Power Gobble Up So Much Energy?

By Christopher Bergland on October 21, 2017 in The Athlete's Way
New research explains why it's difficult for our brains and bodies to optimize cognitive and physical performance simultaneously.
tookapic at pexels

Fighting Dementia Through Vision and Hearing

By Matthew J. Edlund M.D. on October 19, 2017 in The Power of Rest
Small changes in vision and hearing affect future dementia. What can you do?

Homo Dichotomus

By Joachim I Krueger Ph.D. on October 14, 2017 in One Among Many
When statisticians call each other mad.
Random House

Our Memory Quirks: Are They for Us or against Us?

By Katherine Ramsland Ph.D. on October 14, 2017 in Shadow Boxing
What if your recollections turned out to be false? Here's a book that tutors you on how your memory works (and doesn't).

My Evening with Armistead

By Rick Miller LICSW on October 04, 2017 in Unwrapped
Who are you now? How did you get here? Who helped you arrive
"Yin and Yang" by Klem - This vector image was created with Inkscape by Klem, and then manually edited by Mnmazur.. Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons a/File:Yin_and_Yang.svg

Alien Abduction Part III

By John Cline Ph.D. on September 30, 2017 in Sleepless in America
Alien abduction experiences may be due to a wide range of causes including hypnotic phenomena, surgical anesthesia, sleep state dissociations, and maybe alien abductions.

Using Your Smartphone Camera as a Mindfulness Tool

By Linda Wasmer Andrews on September 28, 2017 in Minding the Body
Point, shoot, observe. Your phone’s camera may help you focus on the moment and foster mindfulness. It all depends on how you use it.

Magnesium and Zinc Are Essential for Healthy Brain Function

Ever wonder about the role of magnesium and zinc in healthy brain function? Studies show that both minerals have beneficial effects on mood, memory and other areas of functioning.

Outlook on Alzheimer's No Longer Bleak

options for reversing early Alzheimer's exist.

Aging Shrinks the Brain

By William R. Klemm Ph.D. on September 23, 2017 in Memory Medic
Age discrimination is not defensible. Each elderly person's mental competence has to be judged on its own merits, not on a negative stereotype of the elderly.

What Creates Superior Brain Connectivity, According to Study

By Susan Reynolds on September 19, 2017 in Prime Your Gray Cells
Participants on the “positive” side reflected stronger connectivity associated with higher cognitive functions, including memory, language, introspection, and imagination.

Exploding Three Myths and Stereotypes of Aging

Are we really predestined to become senile and fall apart as we age? Let's stand up for ourselves and appreciate the facts of growing older.

The World Isn’t Designed Well for People With Bipolar

By Elizabeth Brondolo Ph.D. on September 11, 2017 in Take Control
How can we better engineer products to help people with bipolar disorder?

52 Ways to Show I Love You: Honor the Irreplaceable Moments

By Roni Beth Tower Ph.D., ABPP on September 03, 2017 in Life, Refracted
Moments in our life that are unique and memorable bring opportunities to show love of our self and of another. They require us to slow down, allow the mystical, and be authentic.

Pressing the Button

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on September 02, 2017 in How To Do Life
At death’s door, she revisits her life.

Remembering Barbara Cook

By Susan Hooper on August 30, 2017 in Detours and Tangents
Legendary singer Barbara Cook, who died in August at 89, overcame crippling mid-career alcoholism and depression. Her 2016 memoir "Then & Now" is a moving reflection on her life.

Do We See the World Like a Movie?

By William R. Klemm Ph.D. on August 26, 2017 in Memory Medic
The two-stage model of perception may have profound implications beyond sensation that involve working memory, ideation, reasoning, decision-making, and voluntary behavior.
Life Sciences Database/Wikimedia Commons

Want to Keep Your Brain Youthful? You Should Be Dancing

By Christopher Bergland on August 26, 2017 in The Athlete's Way
New research confirms that any type of aerobic activity has neuroprotective benefits. That said, learning choreographed dance routines appear to have specific anti-aging benefits.

Back to School: Packing Your Emotional Backpack

Witnessing the pain of our children—the shutting down and withdrawal—may reawaken feeling-traps of our own, and cause us to respond in disproportionate ways.

Do Adult Dogs Still Recognize Their Mothers?

Does the emotional link between a canine mother and her puppies carry over into their adulthood?

To Heal Trauma, Work with the Body

When cognitive therapy is not enough to heal trauma, consider taking a body-based approach.

Are Older People Wiser?

By Lawrence R Samuel Ph.D. on August 20, 2017 in Boomers 3.0
Memory worsens as we get older, but research also suggests that our strategy for the way that we process thoughts and information changes for the better.

What Your Earliest Food Memories Say About You

Memories of food associated with growing up influence you in ways you never realized. New research shows the role that food memory plays in adapting to adult life.

Is Your Brain Older Than You Are?

By William R. Klemm Ph.D. on August 15, 2017 in Memory Medic
Memory loss is a main symptom of excessive brain aging that we can all notice.

First Memories

Like a child who uses a blanket to self-soothe, a memory may be a psychological mechanism awakened at certain moments to protect us from hopelessness.

How Over-Learning can Solidify a Skill

Can practicing a skill beyond the point of mastery solidify it in memory? Study suggests it can, and that neural inhibition might prevent interference by another task.

Criticizing a Saint Part 2

Revisiting the decision not to interview Viktor Frankl.

Glen Campbell’s Farewell Tour, Accompanied by Alzheimer’s

By Dean Olsher MS, MT-BC, LCAT on August 09, 2017 in A Sound Mind
"Even though Campbell cannot recognize himself in a home movie from his younger days, he is still able to deploy his exquisite singing voice and guitar chops onstage."

Mental Down Time Affects Learning

By William R. Klemm Ph.D. on August 04, 2017 in Memory Medic
"All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy," might be re-framed, "all work and no rest makes Jack a poor learner."