Essential Reads

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Picture Perfect?

Parents often do not intend to relay the message that comes with unwanted photography: it is more important for me to get the right shot of you than to respect your wishes.

Stress and Memory Impairment in Older Adults

Stress reduction is important for optimal cognitive aging.

The Radical Notion of Returning to Handwriting

Need to remember something or learn something new? Write it by hand.

From A Mother Who Died Too Young

I share reflections on losing my mother at a young age to cancer, and what this has taught me about motherhood.

More Posts on Memory

Forever Now

By William R. Klemm Ph.D. on May 21, 2017 in Memory Medic
The usually benign herpes simplex virus is not always so benign.

Cancer, Keeping Active, and the Mind

By Anne Moyer Ph.D. on May 17, 2017 in Beyond Treatment
Cancer treatment can make one reluctant to get moving.

The Habit Replacement Loop

Replace your bad habits with good ones! New research on habit formation offers information on how to improve student success by establishing a new normal in learning.

Naps Help Preschoolers Learn Language

By Temma Ehrenfeld on May 12, 2017 in Open Gently
Small children learn words more easily if they get enough sleep.

Cannabis Reverses Brain Aging in Mice

By Susan McQuillan M.S., RDN on May 09, 2017 in Cravings
Struggling with memory loss? Finding it hard to learn new things? Scientists are one step closer to finding a treatment for the loss of cognitive function associated with aging.

Diet Soda Tied to Memory Loss

By Temma Ehrenfeld on May 08, 2017 in Open Gently
Soda, diet or sugary, is linked to memory loss.

Investigating Brain Activity Outside the Laboratory

The brains have left the lab! This relatively new neuroimaging method enables researchers to study psychological phenomena in naturalistic environments.

Finding Meaning After Losing Faith

Young people who question everything may be born into communities that insist it is wrong to doubt their religion. Here's the story of one who got away and found his own meaning.

Unusual Names In Learning Research

By Jesse Marczyk Ph.D. on May 01, 2017 in Pop Psych
If you want to know how much research tells you about the real world, you better understand how closely the two things resemble each other. In this case, not very much.

The Neuroscience of Hearing the Soundtracks of Your Life

Neuroscientists recently discovered that someone's favorite music—or any song you'd put on a "this is my life" soundtrack—activates brain networks in universally predictable ways.

A Conversation With Dani Shapiro About Memory and Marriage

By Jennifer Haupt on April 26, 2017 in One True Thing
"I was aware that in attempting to tell the truth of our marriage I was at risk of exposing or betraying it. That was the high-wire act."

Fatigue, the Brain and Therapists

By Jenni Ogden Ph.D. on April 26, 2017 in Trouble in Mind
Studies have found that debilitating fatigue is a common symptom of many types of brain damage and disorders, from mild head injury to benign pituitary adenoma to dementia.

How Smart Is My Child?

By Stuart Shanker DPhil on April 24, 2017 in Self-Reg
When we measure a child’s “intelligence,” the score we arrive at is a product of the interaction between thinking processes and limbic brakes.

Treating Depression by Training Your Amygdala

A recent study indicates that increasing activity in the amygdala during positive memory retrieval can have a strong antidepressant effect in depressed individuals.
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Are You Getting Enough Sleep?

Sleep deprivation has been linked to increases in depression, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, as well as memory and cognitive problems.

Train Too Much and a Dog Won't Remember

Back to back training sessions involving different tasks impairs a dog's long-term memory of what he has learned

What Mythology Reveals about the Mind

By John A. Johnson Ph.D. on April 18, 2017 in Cui Bono
"That is a myth," usually means "That is not true." But can myths reveal truths about the mind? And did you know that the stories you tell about yourself can be useful myth-making?

The Courage of Bob

By Greg O'Brien on April 17, 2017 in On Pluto
At 78, there are a lot of miles on Bob Bertschy, who, as a lanky young ballplayer, crouched behind home plate, wearing the “tools of ignorance,” as a catcher with the LA Dodgers.

Memories From a One-Room Country School

Have you ever wondered what it would be like to go to a school with all eight grades under one roof with no electricity or phone and where everyone drank from same dipper?

MIT Scientists Identify Brain Circuits of Memory Formation

MIT neuroscientists have discovered previously unknown brain circuitry necessary for memory formation. These revolutionary findings defy traditional memory consolidation models.

What We've Learned About ADHD

By Lybi Ma on April 04, 2017 in Brainstorm
Are you up to date on ADHD research?

Perspective: The Difference Maker in Memories & Experiences

By Elyssa Barbash Ph.D. on April 03, 2017 in Trauma and Hope
Perspective is the main factor in determining how an event resonates with you, how you feel about a situation, and how you will remember what happened.
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No One Lives in the Past

By Tim Carey Ph.D. on March 31, 2017 in In Control
We’re not living in the past, we’re sorting in the present.

Getting Education Right—For a Change

By William R. Klemm Ph.D. on March 31, 2017 in Memory Medic
The most important thing you should learn in school is to learn how to learn.
“237/365 Bittersweet [explored]” by martinak15 is licensed under CC BY 2.0

When We Feel the Tears of Blessedness, We Feel Alive

This happy/sad blend can be called poignancy. It is the bittersweet state we have all felt when a joyous but fleeting thing happens.
Photographee.eu

New Study Identifies "Microdreams"

By Michelle Carr on March 25, 2017 in Dream Factory
An exciting new paper published in Neuroscience of Consciousness zooms in on a new avenue for dream research: the Microdream.

Disney Research Pioneers New Frontiers Using Virtual Reality

Walt Disney researchers are fine-tuning virtual reality (VR) technologies that could be used to improve athletic performance and many other "proprioception-based" daily activities.