Essential Reads

Coping with Micro-Stressors: How Do I Work My Smart TV?

How do I work my Smart TV? What can we do about micro-stressors?

Why Are Crowded City Dwellers Living the Slow Life?

The big city means the fast life, unrestricted sexuality, street gangs, and hordes of uncaring people. Right? Maybe not, according to a recently published series of studies.

Heat Wave Temperatures Make It Tougher to Do the Right Thing

As millions of people endure record-breaking heat waves, a new study reminds us of the psychological impact high temperatures can have on prosocial behaviors.

Pope Francis, Conservation Psychology, Science, and Earth

By Marc Bekoff Ph.D. on June 13, 2017 in Animal Emotions
The Pope's encyclical letter on care for our common home has many very important ideas that are closely related to conservation psychology, anthrozoology, and the role of science.

More Posts on Environment

We Live in a Zoo!

Is our current living environment creating physical and emotional problems for us?

At Home in Your Vehicle

The “house” in “household hazards” depends on where you spend your time. And, as the venue changes, so too can its potential hazards.

The U.S. Is Not Doing Well Socially

By Christopher Lane Ph.D. on June 24, 2017 in Side Effects
The U.S. shows growing signs of being an unhappy, divided country, according to a string of indexes measuring national happiness and well-being.

A Short History of Love

By Neel Burton M.D. on June 23, 2017 in Hide and Seek
How love became the new religion.

What Older Dads Need To Know

Are geeks taking over the world? The sons of older fathers are more geeky, and do better academically in success-predicting academics. The "Geek Index" helps us study geekiness.

Social Loneliness May Make the Depressed Even More So

Clinically it has to be labelled mental illness, this depression. Is it an illness, however, this need to converse authentically?

Unimagined Sensitivities, Part 7

By Michael Jawer on June 18, 2017 in Feeling Too Much
A person who is highly sensitive to her or his feelings—and to others’ feelings—is likely to be extra sensitive to her or his environment.

The Plant Paradox: Are All Vegetables Good for Us?

By Lori Russell-Chapin Ph.D. on June 17, 2017 in Brain Waves
Is it possible that hidden lectins in our foods are harming us?

Designing for Diet Season

Tweak the design of your home to live a healthier life.

Four Possible Explanations for Online Dating Rejection

By Martin Graff Ph.D. on June 15, 2017 in Love, Digitally
Anonymity and the fleeting nature of a hook-up culture may lead to ghosting.

A Possible Sign from God That He (It) Exists

By Izzy Kalman on June 14, 2017 in Resilience to Bullying
Could it be that a familiar cosmic illusion considered by scientists to be a pure coincidence is actually a clever sign from God to mankind that He exists?

My 20-Year Journey Toward a Unified Framework

A retrospective on my work toward a unified framework for psychology and psychotherapy.

6 Ways Public Swimming Pools Have Changed

Gone are the unadorned rectangular pools of yesteryear. Now, public pools are full-fledged aquatic complexes that proffer an immersive experience.

Is Your Company’s Diversity Training Making You More Biased?

By David Rock on June 07, 2017 in Your Brain at Work
Corporate inclusion programs often create an "us versus them" mindset. But establishing shared goals can help get teams on track.
Hma with Permission

Why Disasters Repeat Themselves

It is often observed that history is inevitably prone to repeat itself, and perhaps nowhere is this truer than in disasters.

"The Sounds of Silence"

We need more silence in our lives, as noisy machinery, constant media, a troubled world, life's pressures and internal distress bombard us: We sorely need relief from cacophony...

Trump Coal Rolls the World

What if Stephen K. Bannon remade Smokey & the Bandit with the coal-rolling Koch bros terrorizing Prius drivers while Scott Pruitt, as the hapless sheriff, pretended to catch them?

Four Reasons Why Paganism and Polyamory Are Linked

This blog introduces and defines Paganism, and then explains four reasons why there is such a significant overlap between polyamorists and Pagans in the United States.

A Bird's Life in New York City

By Debbie Joffe Ellis on June 04, 2017 in Tried and True
By choosing to perform acts of kindness whenever possible, we help the lives of others and of ourselves, and can make our tender and vulnerable world more safe and stable.

Paying It Forward: Generativity and Your Vagus Nerve

Scientific research suggests that if each of us made an effort to improve our "vagal tone" that we could create an upward spiral that would make the world a better place.

Happy If—Happy When: Why Write a Musical?

I am writing a musical called Happy If—Happy When about two artists and their five children who move from the city to a farm in the country. Why write a musical?

The Psychophysiology of Flow and Your Vagus Nerve

New research offers fresh clues about the psychology and physiological components that come together to create what Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi famously describes as a state "flow."

From Weekends to Weekdays

How To Make The Transition Back To The Work Week Easier

Authoritarianism Comes with a Huge Price

Empathy is the key to conflict resolution and lack of empathy is the source of great conflict.

Awe Engages Your Vagus Nerve and Can Combat Narcissism

Recent research shows that experiencing a sense of awe promotes the "small self" and can combat narcissism by activating the parasympathetic vagal response to "tend-and-befriend."
Pixabay/Wokandapix

The Catastrophic Effects of Mental Health Stigma

Transforming mental health in America. We have a long way to go.

“I Don’t Have the Bandwidth for That”

Have computers changed the way you see yourself? Why losing touch with nature can be hazardous to your health.

Reclaiming Human Dignity

Have you experienced religiously-based abuse or violence? This post explores the ideological basis for Judeo-Christian patterns of aggression.
Inner City Books, used with permission

Jungian Analyst Marion Woodman on the American Psyche

By Pythia Peay on May 18, 2017 in America On The Couch
Your ancestors went through the anguish of breaking with their mother country [Britain], even fighting and killing the soldiers of “the mother.” Marion Woodman

Freedom

What does freedom really mean?