Essential Reads

Can Our Anger Be Explained by Global Brain Vulnerabilities?

Is it possible that our angry world reflects changing anger thresholds in our brains?

Why Do We Ask Why?

By Mario Livio Ph.D. on June 23, 2017 in Why?
Curiosity fuels brain growth, and brain growth drives curiosity. And you wouldn't be so curious if your ancestors hadn't learned to cook.

When We Outsource Talking to Toys

Many of us are drawn in by the promise that electronic toys will help our children learn. But do they live up to this promise?

How Hobbies Impact Your Head and Your Heart

Are you looking to feel happier, younger and smarter? An hour a day could make all the difference.

More Posts on Cognition

How Do Psychotherapists Think?

By Paul Thagard Ph.D. on June 26, 2017 in Hot Thought
Psychotherapists need complex reasoning to determine how to help the people they treat. Such assessment is not simply matching features, but requires building a causal account.

Are Smartphones Making Us Stupid?

A new study reports that the mere sight of one's own smartphone—even if the phone is turned off and face down—can create "brain drain" by depleting finite cognitive resources.

Beyond the Prophylactic and the Panacea

The hospital is a complex solution for the care of the elderly and delirium is an evolutionary fact for which assistance must be given.

Andrew Weil: Coincidences in an Amazing Life

Coincidences in the professional life of a major contributor to the advancement of medicine.

What’s “Emotional Reasoning”—And Why Is It Such a Problem?

One of the most baffling psychological problems is to acutely feel the reality of something without its having any basis in fact. Here are some examples...

Your Right to an Opinion Does Not Make Your Opinion Valid

By Cortney S. Warren Ph.D. on June 19, 2017 in Naked Truth
Everyone is entitled to their opinion. But not all opinions are equally valuable.
By Sanjay Acharya (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 Wikimedia Commons

New Thinking Required: Oil, Cars, and Walking

Cars changed us. How will we change cars?

Yoga and Quality of Life for Cancer Patients

By Anne Moyer Ph.D. on June 18, 2017 in Beyond Treatment
With the physical, emotional, cognitive, and existential difficulties that cancer patients face, yoga seems like a fitting remedy.
Sara Canaday

Cognitive Diversity

By Sara Canaday on June 18, 2017 in You (According to Them)
What does the concept of cognitive diversity mean? When leaders surround themselves with people who "constantly validate and reflect their own beliefs," it stifles fresh thinking.

The Factor That Administers Cognitive Control over Emotions

Some recent research on poor cognitive control and depression has overlooked four issues. This post suggests that it is cognitive understanding of reality that regulates emotions.

Statistics as a Social Process

Statistics is a bag of tools for inductive inference. No more. Do not be afraid.

Stop Thinking, Start Being

What frightens people about adding mindfulness or meditation to their lives? Savor the "now" to be able to relish the memory.

How Our Bodies Age (Part 3)

What changes in our nervous system can we expect as we age? And what are the implications?

How Your Body Changes Your Visual Perception as You Walk

By Linda Wasmer Andrews on June 14, 2017 in Minding the Body
Your body helps shape what you see on the walking path. Here's the latest research—and what it means for walkers and hikers.

Is It ADHD or a Thyroid Disorder?

Do you have ADHD or a thyroid disorder? Symptoms can be very similar. There's also a chance that you can have ADHD and thyroid issues at the same time.

Dog Obedience Trials Began Because of Poodles and a Farmer

A woman's desire to prove that Poodles were not stupid useless dogs ultimately gave birth to modern dog obedience trials

Understanding Your Emotions

What are emotions, how to better understand them, and when it is optimal to modify them.

The Extraordinary Sensorium of Brian Wilson

By Maureen Seaberg on June 12, 2017 in Sensorium
How Beach Boy Brian Wilson, deaf in one ear, manages that remarkable sound...
Marcel Segessmann (Privat) [CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons

Building Resilient Organisations One Brain at a Time, Part 1

Want to build a resilient organisation? A few steps focused on the individual can make a huge difference.

"Little Brain" Plays Surprisingly Big Role in Mental Health

First-of-its-kind research has discovered that the cerebellum (Latin for "little brain") plays a significant—and previously unrecognized—role in a wide range of mental disorders.

My 20-Year Journey Toward a Unified Framework

A retrospective on my work toward a unified framework for psychology and psychotherapy.

Playing (Video) Games With Your IQ

By Elias Aboujaoude M.D. on June 11, 2017 in Compulsive Acts
Are video games making us smarter?

Connecting the (Hidden) Dots

By Po Chi Wu Ph.D. on June 09, 2017 in Jacob's Staff
What dots do we choose to form patterns? What patterns make sense to us, and which dots are discarded? What dots do we infer?
Can Stock Photo 19486083

Does the Brain Create the Mind? Speculation on Consciousness

What can science tell us about the hard problem, finding the origins of consciousness?

Protecting Brain Injured Patients in Legal Proceedings

By James F. Zender Ph.D. on June 09, 2017 in The New Normal
Protective orders can protect people who have compromised cognitive functioning.

First Sight:a Theory for Right Place Right Time Coincidences

Somehow we show up in the right place at the right time, seemingly guided by information from outside of us. Psychologist Jim Carpenter has an explanation.

Overcoming Sex Addiction: A Self-help Guide

By The Book Brigade on June 08, 2017 in The Author Speaks
Compulsive sexual behavior typically conceals negative feelings about oneself—feelings that are readily treatable.

Mapping the Sources of Power

The 1998 map of our cognitive sources of power still seems relevant. However, an updated version distinguishes the knowledge that we acquire from ways we can apply that knowledge.

What Are Canine Calming Signals and Do They Work?

New data shows that of 30 different cataloged calming signals in dogs, some of them do, in fact, reduce the level of aggression in dogs that see them.

Linguistic and Cultural Challenges of Foreign Correspondents

How do foreign correspondents navigate, linguistically and culturally, between the country they are working in and the country they are reporting to?