Essential Reads

Cognitive Dissonance and the Franken Sexual Harassment Case

By Shawn M. Burn Ph.D. on November 18, 2017 in Presence of Mind
Democrats and feminists must honestly grapple with the cognitive dissonance generated by the Franken sexual harassment case.

How to Break Free From Excessive Internet Gaming

By Seth J. Gillihan Ph.D. on November 17, 2017 in Think, Act, Be
There is a growing awareness that problematic Internet use can have serious consequences. A new study demonstrated one simple technique that can help.

Measurement Validity Explained in Simple Language

By John A. Johnson Ph.D. on November 17, 2017 in Cui Bono
How do we know that a test that allegedly measures shyness actually measures shyness?

Sleep Strengthens Recent Learning and Negative Memories

By Lydia Denworth on November 16, 2017 in Brain Waves
What happens in the brain during sleep? Quite a lot. Machine learning and EEG are revealing how memories, especially negative ones, and learning are boosted while we're asleep.

More Posts on Cognition

Why You Should Consider Serving Fish This Thanksgiving

By Andrew E. Budson M.D. on November 19, 2017 in Managing Your Memory
Wondering what foods can reduce the risk of stroke and Alzheimer’s and actually improve cognitive function? Hint: It isn’t blueberries, coconut oil, or turmeric.
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The Ego and Delirium

We must confront a terrifying fact: Delirium, in its distressing volatility, in its elusive content, is a temporal horizon between meaning and nothingness.

Use Scientific Methods to Detect Fake News

Both fake news and science became salient issues during last year’s presidential election. Understanding the principles of scientific methods can help detect false information.
Kelly Sikkema/Unsplash

Forget Intelligence. Aim for Mental Complexity

By Ryan Smerek, Ph.D. on November 17, 2017 in Learning at Work
Looking for a different way to think about expanding awareness of workplace dynamics?

What Are Spiritual Guidelines for Organizational Success?

Group entrainment can lead to desired outcomes in sports, jazz, and organizations.

Chimps Seem to Know What Others Know—So Do Dogs at Play

By Marc Bekoff Ph.D. on November 17, 2017 in Animal Emotions
Chimps alter alarm calls and seem to know what others know about possible danger.
 Bart LaRue / Unsplash

When Should You Trust Your Gut? Here's What the Science Says

By Al Pittampalli on November 16, 2017 in Are You Persuadable?
Without the answer, you can't be an effective decision maker.

A Pretty Good Organizing System for Non-Linear Thinkers

By Nancy Darling Ph.D. on November 15, 2017 in Thinking About Kids
Non-linear thinkers are great at connecting ideas. This organizing system helps harvest non-linear connections and tame the chaos.

Change Your Brain With Cognitive Therapy

Ever question the touchy-feely techniques recommended by your therapist? Here's why you should take their advice!

Is Your Sexuality Harmonious or Obsessive?

By Grant H. Brenner M.D. on November 15, 2017 in ExperiMentations
Research suggests that distinguishing between harmonious and obsessive passion is a useful psychological re-frame and associated with different outcomes.
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Super Agers May Be Smarter than Their Peers

By Jane Adams Ph.D. on November 14, 2017 in Between the Lines
Young friends keep you young, smart, and in the know.

Do Animals Have Emotions? A Debate

By Paul Thagard Ph.D. on November 14, 2017 in Hot Thought
The legitimacy of the argument that non-human animals have emotions is debated by an advocate and a skeptic.

Once and for All: Aerobic Exercise Increases Brain Size

By Christopher Bergland on November 14, 2017 in The Athlete's Way
A new systematic review and meta-analysis confirms (once and for all) that aerobic exercise makes the human brain bigger.

Magical Thinking and Unloved Daughters: Childhood and Beyond

By Peg Streep on November 13, 2017 in Tech Support
What helps you escape from an unhappy childhood—the power of your imagination–may get in the way of your recovery in adulthood.

Thinking About Non-Monogamy?

By Samantha Joel on November 13, 2017 in Dating Decisions
Emerging research suggests that non-monogamous relationships can be just as satisfying as monogamous ones.

Is a Little Knowledge Really a Dangerous Thing?

By Romeo Vitelli Ph.D. on November 13, 2017 in Media Spotlight
While we may be impressed by people willing to make bold statements (especially at election time), the fact is that, more often than not, overconfidence can be a grave mistake

Why We Might Feel Lonely Around Narcissism

By Grant H. Brenner M.D. on November 13, 2017 in ExperiMentations
Experiencing an unstable sense of self is a challenging experience on many levels. Empathy in narcissism is shaped by sense of self, as researchers are exploring.
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Brain Fields, Complexity, and Consciousness

Complexity science provides a means to measure consciousness in coma and semi-conscious patients.

Can Bad Emotions Be Good for You?

By Marcia Reynolds Psy.D. on November 12, 2017 in Wander Woman
Nonpositive emotions can motivate productive behavior. Learn how you can use them to channel your energy in positive directions.

The Paradox of "In Here" and "Out There"

It seems that, at least in the academic realm, the "objective" reality does not have to "prove" anything. It simply is. Accepted as it is—as The Truth.

52 Ways: What Motivates Others Who Threaten a Relationship?

By Roni Beth Tower Ph.D., ABPP on November 12, 2017 in Life, Refracted
A couple's relationship can be threatened by others. To minimize potential damage, explore conscious or unconscious motives that a third party might have.

Train Your Brain's Flexibility with These Seven Tips

Get your memory in shape by improving your brain's flexibility. Never again forget what you're doing with these 7 research-based tips.

Why Cognition Should Be the Fifth Vital Sign

By Mylea Charvat, Ph.D. on November 09, 2017 in The Fifth Vital Sign
Cognition should be a key vital sign and is as important to measure on a regular basis as blood pressure, heart rate, respiratory rate, and temperature.

Body Objectification: The Psychology Behind This Epidemic

By Zack Carter Ph.D. on November 09, 2017 in Clear Communication
Implicit association tests are clear but they shouldn't be an excuse to objectify the human body. Understanding the psychology behind objectification might help us fight back.

Aging, Health, and Conscious Evolution (Part 2)

How can we keep our inevitable failures from causing us to feel negative or downhearted or arouse self-pity?

Sheep Discriminate Faces, So What's In It For the Sheep?

By Marc Bekoff Ph.D. on November 09, 2017 in Animal Emotions
Sheep display "surprising" cognitive skills. This discovery is related to human diseases from which sheep don't usually suffer. Should transgenic sheep be created to learn more?

Why Does My Child Hate Math?

By Stuart Shanker Ph.D. on November 09, 2017 in Self-Reg
How can we help a child with a kindled math alarm? How can we prevent this from happening in the first place?

Thinking About Switching Careers? Read This First.

Anxious about making a big career change? Here are the do's and dont's!

Five Ways to Ensure Long-Term Retention of Spelling Words

Building word permanency in the brain is a gift to a child for a lifetime of reading and writing.

Cultural Keywords

By Marianna Pogosyan Ph.D. on November 08, 2017 in Between Cultures
Cultural keywords reveal values, ways of thinking and feeling in different cultures.