Essential Reads

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To Sleep, Perhaps to Learn

By William R. Klemm Ph.D. on February 22, 2017 in Memory Medic
Odds are the kids in your life are not getting enough sleep. Scientists now know that sleep is needed for "smart forgetting."

The Neuroscience of Fearful Memories and Avoidance Behaviors

By Christopher Bergland on February 20, 2017 in The Athlete's Way
Neuroscientists have identified how the brain remembers fearful experiences. And how fear-based memories can lead to avoidance behaviors.

Could Thinking Positively Be Dangerous Right Now?

Have you started opening the newspapers each day with a sense of dread and disbelief about that latest actions of President Trump and his administration?

Are Refugees a Threat to Americans?

Are refugees a threat to the safety of Americans? Research suggests we needn't be afraid.

More Posts on Cognition

Don’t Let Your Thinking Sabotage Your Goals

By David Ludden Ph.D. on February 24, 2017 in Talking Apes
How you see yourself in the future can either help or hinder your ability to delay gratification.

How Trump Takes Advantage of the Psychology of Blame

By Robert Klitzman M.D. on February 23, 2017 in Am I My Genes?
To make sense of complex problems, we often seek simple story lines, & these often involve blaming someone, assigning physical and moral cause. Trump takes advantage of this trait.

Dolphins Who Hang With Mates Display a Positive Spin on Life

By Marc Bekoff Ph.D. on February 22, 2017 in Animal Emotions
Dolphins who swim together display positive emotions and seem to be more optimistic than those who don't. This cognitive bias lasts for around two months.

Are There Behavior Changes When Dogs Are Spayed or Neutered?

By Stanley Coren Ph.D., F.R.S.C. on February 22, 2017 in Canine Corner
Data shows that spaying or neutering dogs may not reduce behavior problems but actually tends to increase them.

Creative Thinking is no Longer an Option, It's Essential

The future belongs to creative thinkers. The real currency of our time isn't money, it's ideas. You need to become an ideas generator whatever field you work in.

The timing of free will

By Marc Wittmann Ph.D. on February 18, 2017 in Sense of Time
Why the famous Libet task does not touch on our notion of free will.

5 Tips to Tame Word-Finding Difficulties

Frustrated by word-finding difficulties? Harness the hidden opportunity they provide to boost your brain health.

Do Cleaner Shrimp Get Jealous?

By Peter Toohey Ph.D. on February 17, 2017 in Annals of the Emotions
The jealous triangle is usually reckoned to be one on one, with the prize, say, a lover. But it’s not all sex, it’s not all one on one, and it’s not all humans.

Panpsychism and the Vale of Arve

By David Dillard-Wright Ph.D. on February 17, 2017 in Boundless
Panpsychism upends traditional assumptions in philosophy of mind, metaphysics, and ethics. The human person and the human mind are communal all the way down.

What Is Synchronicity?

David Strabala had a question and set about trying to find the answer. He arranged interviews with experts who he hoped might help him figure out synchronicity.

Experimental Philosophy: Strengths and Limitations

By Paul Thagard Ph.D. on February 17, 2017 in Hot Thought
Experimental philosophy is an important movement in which philosophers systematically collect data about how people think. It has 2 main strengths and 3 surmountable limitations.

This Motivation Hack Will Instantly Alter Your Thinking

By Bobby Hoffman Ph.D. on February 16, 2017 in Motivate!
The "Anchor Hack" can help you identify personal benchmarks that enhance performance and increase achievement.

The Abuse of Language by Groups Seeking Social Change

By Hank Davis on February 16, 2017 in Caveman Logic
You're driving me crazy with your over-the-top language

Managing Information to Be Remembered

By William R. Klemm Ph.D. on February 16, 2017 in Memory Medic
What you just learned can interfere with remembering what you are about to learn.

Joseph LeDoux Reports: Emotions Are “Higher-Order States”

By Christopher Bergland on February 15, 2017 in The Athlete's Way
Legendary neuroscientist Joseph LeDoux (who put the amygdala in the spotlight) has an exciting new hypothesis about how the brain processes emotions.

6 Reasons Why You May Not Know What You're Feeling

By Leon F Seltzer Ph.D. on February 15, 2017 in Evolution of the Self
It might seem almost unfathomable that someone might not be able to recognize what they’re feeling. But the phenomenon is much more common than most people realize.

A Multivocal Self

By Francois Grosjean Ph.D. on February 15, 2017 in Life as a Bilingual
An interview with Julie Choi, author of “Creating a multivocal self”, about the ambiguity and vulnerability of multilingual existence and the pros that outweigh the cons.

Low-Intensity Aerobic Exercise Has Surprising Brain Benefits

By Christopher Bergland on February 14, 2017 in The Athlete's Way
There is growing evidence that low-intensity physical activity has multiple brain benefits. A new study reports that easy aerobic exercise boosts visual sensitivity and perception.

Seeing Past Initial Attraction

How do you move from that "casual space" in a relationship where you haven't yet defined it to knowing whether to move forward or not?

Diagnosing Donald Trump

What does psychiatric diagnosis add to political criticism of President Trump?

Murder, She Didn't Write: Why Can Only Humans be Murdered?

By Marc Bekoff Ph.D. on February 12, 2017 in Animal Emotions
It's time to change the language we use when writing about killing other animals. Killing animals to manage or to collect them as trophies should rightly be called murder.

Radio Stories: Synchronicities in a Therapist’s Office

An interview on a radio show dedicated to coincidence studies features a wide-ranging discussion of clinical experiences with synchronicity.

How to Discern Fake News from Real News

By Marcia Reynolds Psy.D. on February 11, 2017 in Wander Woman
How to weigh your internal assumptions with external "facts" to determine what news you should believe.

Another Limitless Pill Hits the Market. Does It Deliver?

By Richard E. Cytowic M.D. on February 10, 2017 in The Fallible Mind
Drugs that modulate cognition work in those who truly need help. While not intended for healthy brains, some continue to rack up glowing testimonials—especially from journalists.

SHUTi: A New Insomnia Treatment Via the Internet

SHUTi, a promising new Internet-based therapy for treating insomnia, is offering hope to people who can't find or afford a therapist, and don't want to take medication.

Think Someone Might Be Lying to You? Time Will Tell.

By Seth J. Gillihan Ph.D. on February 10, 2017 in Think, Act, Be
Across human communication contexts, nothing is more important than truth. A new meta-analysis describes one important feature that distinguishes fact from fiction.
Fotolia, used with permission

A Survival Guide for Uncertain Times #3: Positive Thinking?

By Allison Carmen on February 10, 2017 in The Gift of Maybe
Giving up positive thinking and embracing the mindset of Maybe can be the key to finding strength and resilience in uncertain times.

NBA Stars and Your Grandparents—Unexpected Similarities?

By Toby Ellmers on February 09, 2017 in Aging Brain, Aging Body
What can sport psychology tell us about older adult fall-risk?

Subconscious Fear Exposure Helps Reduce Phobias, Study Finds

By Christopher Bergland on February 09, 2017 in The Athlete's Way
A new study reports that a technique called "backward masking" can help arachnophobes reduce their fear of spiders simply by subconsciously viewing images of spiders.

“Is Your Pet a Psychopath?”

How did deception evolve, and how do you know it's there? Learn these 4 simple, but overlooked signs.