News

Love at First Sight: New Research on Who's Attracted to Whom

Whether or not you believe in love at first sight, there’s a case to be made for instant attraction. New research on speed-dating shows how personality affects romantic choices.

The Psychology Behind London's Terrorist Attacker

A recent study found that much tactical planning goes into lone-actor terrorist events.

What Happens When You Lie by Telling the Truth?

By Art Markman Ph.D. on March 22, 2017 in Ulterior Motives
Deception is a common activity among people. There are many ways to do it, and they have different influences on ourselves and other people.

How "Daily Uplifts" Can Counter Depression

By Seth J. Gillihan Ph.D. on March 21, 2017 in Think, Act, Be
When we're depressed we tend to think that nothing will lift our mood. Results from a new study suggest otherwise.

Impact of Traumatic Stress on Brain Development

New research points to neurobiological sex differences in youth with PTSD.
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Self-Deception Helps Us Accomplish Goals

By Tim Cole Ph.D. on March 20, 2017 in Intimate Portrait
More often than not, we lead with our goals and desires, not the facts. New research on how our ability to delude ourselves can be quite useful.

Life Expectancy Projected to Increase Worldwide

By Susan McQuillan M.S., RDN on March 20, 2017 in Cravings
Researchers find U.S. lags behind other high-income countries.

Is Your Self-Esteem Too High to Be Successful?

By Rob Henderson on March 20, 2017 in After Service
Self-esteem can be dangerous. Here is a better option backed by research.

Responding to Your Partner's Attachment Style

By David Ludden Ph.D. on March 20, 2017 in Talking Apes
According to recent research, to get what you want out of a relationship, you first have to give your partner what they want.

Is Mental Illness the Rule Rather than the Exception?

We hear all the time that 1 in 5 people struggle with a psychiatric disorder. New research now suggests that we have it backwards.

Intellectual Humility Augments Nonpartisan Open-Mindedness

Regardless of your party or religious beliefs, new research from Duke shows that intellectual humility may be the key to breaking down barriers that divide us.

Two-Legged Walking and Human Skull Traits Evolved in Tandem

Our hominid ancestors' ability to walk upright on two legs evolved in tandem with distinctive traits of the human skull, according to a new follow-up study.

Science News: Believe It or Not?

A new study demonstrates that media reports often miss the real news.

Teen Pregnancies Fall But School Sex Ed Doesn’t Work. Huh?

By Michael Castleman M.A. on March 15, 2017 in All About Sex
The number of teen pregnancies has plummeted by more than half in a generation. But a new analysis shows that school-based sex education classes don't work. How is this possible?

How Would Trumpcare Affect Mental Health Care?

People addicted to opioids and rural Americans would lose "big league"

Machine Learning and Antidepressant Response

By David Hellerstein M.D. on March 14, 2017 in Heal Your Brain
Machine learning offers a powerful new method of exploring response to antidepressant medicine and a host of other treatments throughout medicine, a JAMA Psychiatry report shows.

Cracking a Joke At Work Can Have a Surprising Payoff

By Art Markman Ph.D. on March 14, 2017 in Ulterior Motives
Humor is common in the workplace. Does it make help people to achieve their goals at work?

9 Ways to Respond To Social Identity Threats

Since the presidential election, several sources have indicated that hate crimes and hate speech have increased.

Stress Mindset Tied to Physical and Mental Health

Is stress getting in your way? Modifying your mindset may improve your health.

25 Things You Probably Didn’t Know About Dogs

By Hal Herzog Ph.D. on March 13, 2017 in Animals and Us
Why dogs should not drive cars and other findings from the hot new field of canine science.

Genetics Play a Role in Social Anxiety Disorder, Study Finds

A new study has pinpointed a genetic link between social anxiety disorder (SAD) and a serotonin transporter gene called "SLC6A4."

The Marshmallow Myth

By Nick Tasler on March 09, 2017 in Strategic Thinking
New research suggests that delayed gratification is overrated.

Lack of Sleep Leads to Harsher Punishments

By Art Markman Ph.D. on March 08, 2017 in Ulterior Motives
There are lots of benefits for getting good sleep. How does it affect the way you judge other people?

Mayo Clinic Study Identifies How Exercise Staves Off Old Age

Researchers at the Mayo Clinic have discovered that high-intensity interval training (HIIT) may be a fountain of youth for people of all ages.

Americans Are Having Sex Less Often. Why?

Why Americans are having less sex.

Does Your Body Language Give You Away?

It’s widely known that your body language provides a window into your thoughts. Control that language, with guidance from this new research, to improve your relationships.
Positive Language Has Declined in U.S. Books Over Time, Study Finds

Positive Language Has Declined in U.S. Books Over Time, Study Finds

by on March 07, 2017
Researchers also found a shrinking share of emotional words overall.

Social Media Exacerbates Perceived Social Isolation

A new study reports that heavy use of social media is associated with increased social isolation.

Revenge Really Is Sweet

By Grant H. Brenner M.D. on March 06, 2017 in ExperiMentations
Revenge is sweet, but causes problems in the long run. Why do we so often turn to retaliation to feel better when it doesn't usually work out to mutual advantage?

Brain Size in Bipolar Disorder

New study on how the hippocampus is diminished in size with bipolar disorder.

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