News

The Grace of Dogs: A Boy, a Black Lab, and the Canine Soul

By Marc Bekoff Ph.D. on June 26, 2017 in Animal Emotions
A new book by Andrew Root called The Grace of Dogs: A Boy, a Black Lab, and a Father's Search for the Canine Soul ponders the deep meaning and mystery of dog-human relationships.

Are Smartphones Making Us Stupid?

A new study reports that the mere sight of one's own smartphone—even if the phone is turned off and face down—can create "brain drain" by depleting finite cognitive resources.

Pride in Mental Health: Visibility

An interview with LGBTQ+ activists Dior Vargas and Cole Ledford.

Why Are Crowded City Dwellers Living the Slow Life?

The big city means the fast life, unrestricted sexuality, street gangs, and hordes of uncaring people. Right? Maybe not, according to a recently published series of studies.

Pride in Mental Health: Advocacy

An interview with Jillian Weiss of Transgender Legal Defense & Education Fund, and Calvin Stowell of DoSomething.org.

Heat Wave Temperatures Make It Tougher to Do the Right Thing

As millions of people endure record-breaking heat waves, a new study reminds us of the psychological impact high temperatures can have on prosocial behaviors.

Feeling Powerful Changes How We Respond to Being Stared At

Perceiving ourselves to be higher in status can buffer us from feeling intimidated.

Death Is Inevitable but Not Inevitably Dreadful

In some circumstances, dying may be less awful than people think.

Must We Delay Gratification? Maybe Not

By Lydia Denworth on June 21, 2017 in Brain Waves
Intuition tells us to work first so we'll enjoy playing more later. But new research says we don't have to wait to savor some fun and give ourselves a break.

Humor Sometimes Makes Stressful Situations Better

By Art Markman Ph.D. on June 21, 2017 in Ulterior Motives
Jokes and witty conversation can make you feel closer to the people around you. Is this how humor helps with stress?

The 5 Defense Mechanisms That Can Sabotage Your Relationship

Defense mechanisms are a common way to manage anxiety, but they can get in the way of your close relationships. New research shows how to make your defense mechanisms work for you.

Domestication, It's Complicated

Cats may have been domesticated twice, or more. A new study shows that today’s domestic cats have two sets of maternal ancestors.

The Relationship Between Waist-Hip Ratio and Fertility

In women, a low waist-hip ratio correlates with health, fertility, and attractiveness. However, a new study reveals that it may also distinguish between past and future fertility.

A Behavioral Science Solution to Lies in Politics

Tired of lies in politics? Here's a way to address the problem.

Coping With Not Knowing What Happened to a Missing Loved One

We have become used to images of missing people collecting on street corners as signifying the hope of those searching for any news.

Study Shows a Bias for Evidence of What We Want to Be True

New experimental findings suggest that we seek and stress corroborating evidence based on what we desire.

How Our Thoughts Change When We Fall Asleep

By Michelle Carr on June 15, 2017 in Dream Factory
“It seems that in REM sleep, to think is to do… that is, to realise any possibility that presents itself."

How Maternal Personality Problems Affect Children

How does parental personality dysfunction affect the future mental health of offspring? New research highlights how psychological issues carry over through generations.

Decreasing Self-Centeredness May Also Help Reduce Loneliness

A study published today by John Cacioppo and colleagues reports that self-centeredness and perceived social isolation feed off one another as part of a reciprocal feedback loop.

When Coaching, Not Talent, Wins

By Steven Berglas Ph.D. on June 13, 2017 in Executive Ego
The Warriors' win holds lessons for every executive, basketball fan or not.

10 Ways to Cope With Life's Unpleasant Tasks

Life often presents us with tasks that we’d rather not have to tackle. When faced with the inevitable, new research suggests how to make the whole process that much easier.

For a Profound Sense of Meaning in Life, Have Sex

By Todd B. Kashdan Ph.D. on June 13, 2017 in Curious?
How central is sexuality to the development of well-being? New research untangles the association between sexuality and various dimensions of well-being.
Rob Hyronds/Shutterstock

New Promise for the Treatment of Schizophrenia

A new class of compounds that may be useful in the treatment of schizophrenia.

Why Do We Struggle to Express Affection?

New research shows that low self-esteem can cause us to underestimate the benefits of showing affection and gratitude to our loved ones.

How Terrorism Changes Us

By David B. Feldman Ph.D. on June 09, 2017 in Supersurvivors
The London Bridge attack is the latest terror incident to rock the UK in the past 10 weeks. How are acts of terror changing us?

New Research Explains Why Overthinking Can Hinder Creativity

A growing body of research helps to explain why "unclamping" the rigid intellectual machinery and executive function of your prefrontal cortex facilitates creativity.

Why Some People Just Have Difficult Relationships

You may regard yourself as pretty easy-going, so why are some people in your life so very hard to get along with? New research shows why the difficult are so difficult.

Seeing Things from Another's Perspective Creates Empathy

By Art Markman Ph.D. on June 06, 2017 in Ulterior Motives
Often, when you have a difference in opinion with someone else, you are encouraged to “see the world from their perspective.” What does that mean?

Do Women Prefer Partners Who Resemble Their Brothers?

New research suggests that there is a "family resemblance" between women's boyfriends and brothers.

Prompt Treatment for Psychosis Patients

Study reveals weaker brain connections in patients who did not receive prompt treatment for psychosis.

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