News

New Research Confirms 9 Ways to Help Beat Dementia

By Susan McQuillan M.S., RDN on August 17, 2017 in Cravings
Don't wait until you're old to worry about dementia—act now to prevent cognitive decline.

Few Women in Tech

Multiple causes underlie the lack of women in tech jobs. Complex thinking is required to understand the issue rather than simply arguing for either nature or nurture.

What Are the Roots of Distress Among Refugees?

Research is changing the way we address the mental health needs of refugees.

A Moral Compass for Troubling Times

We need a clear moral compass during these complicated times.

Decrazifying Cryptocurrency

By Moses Ma on August 15, 2017 in The Tao of Innovation
Curious about the Bitcoin and cryptocurrency revolution? Here's a balanced analysis of what's going on.

Does "Tough Love" Produce Better Working Dogs?

Puppies with overly attentive mothers have poorer problem-solving abilities and are less likely to succeed as service dogs.

How Likely Is Your Partner to Cheat on You?

By Grant H. Brenner M.D. on August 14, 2017 in ExperiMentations
Are you concerned your partner may be seeing someone else when you've agreed to be exclusive? Researchers continue to study infidelity to better understand when and how it happens.

Race in America: Tips on Talking With Children About Racism

Current events depicting racism often spark the race conversation. How can you have the talk with your kid?

How Do We Read Emotions in Robots?

In time of need, will you let a robot help you? A new study examines this.

Bumper Stickers Can Facilitate Dynamic Social Interactions

By Christopher Bergland on August 13, 2017 in The Athlete's Way
The tragic events in Charlottesville have left many of us speechless. The only cogent response I have for my 9-year-old daughter is from a "Hate Has No Home Here" bumper sticker.

Personality and Potential Nuclear Confrontation

By Ian H. Robertson Ph.D. on August 12, 2017 in The Stress Test
The possible catastrophe of nuclear war rests on the psychology of just two men

The Psychology of the New McCarthyism

By Lee Jussim Ph.D. on August 11, 2017 in Rabble Rouser
On the rising threat to science and basic human rights in America.

New Research On How Waiting Impacts Consumer Behavior

An hour wait for that trendy new cupcake? How long you wait may impact how much you buy.

Crime and Punishment (and Twitter)

Scientists are exploring what social media can reveal about patterns of wrongdoing.

Debunking Neuromyths: Eight Common Brain Myths Set Straight

By Christopher Bergland on August 10, 2017 in The Athlete's Way
A new study puts brain myths in the spotlight. True or false: "Some people are left-brained and some of us are right-brained." Many believe this myth is true. It's not.

Why Are Some Children Picky Eaters?

New research suggests that children who are inhibited are less likely to try new foods.

How Children’s Brains Learn to Reason

By Lydia Denworth on August 09, 2017 in Brain Waves
Reasoning is a profoundly important cognitive skill that affects achievement in school and in challenging careers. Now we know more about how it develops in children's brains.

What Makes a Dog Notice a Person

Is it the sight of you, the sounds you make, or your scent that is most likely to make a dog aware that you are nearby?

Two Types of Relationship Aggression Identified

Is impossible for couples to avoid arguments but new research on long-term relationships suggests that some forms are more damaging than others. Here’s how to avoid the bad kind.

Death May Be More Positive for the Dying Than We Expect

By Art Markman Ph.D. on August 08, 2017 in Ulterior Motives
It seems straightforward to say that death is scary and bad. Many people express that they have a fear of death. Do people nearing death express lots of fear and anxiety?

On That Google Memo About Sex Differences

Are sex differences in personality real? A response to the Google memo.

How Smart Should a Leader Be?

By Romeo Vitelli Ph.D. on August 07, 2017 in Media Spotlight
Is it possible for a leader to be too smart? New research suggests that the link between intelligence and perceived leadership may be more complicated than you might think.

Are Dogs Getting Cuter?

Dogs that fit Lorenz's 'Kindchenschema' are becoming ever more popular, but at great cost to their welfare.

I Love Him Most of the Time

Lively’s claim that she loves Reynolds most of the time runs counter to the nature of profound love. She probably desires him sexually most of the time, but loves him all the time.

Evolved for Activism

Political activism has deep ancestral roots - going back to foundational features of what it means to be human. Understanding this fact can help make this world a better place.

The Psychiatric Scapegoating of Michelle Carter

The woman convicted in the texting-suicide case is guilty of no crime.
photo miguel ugalde/words added/freeimages

When Is Speech Violence and What’s the Real Harm?

When protesters equate speech with violence, we aren't surprised. But now at least one academic is using science to validate the claim. Is it just harmless rhetoric?

How Much Gender Inequality Is There in Internet Pornography?

How are men and women represented in online porn? New research suggests that there continue to be pervasive inequalities in the way women are depicted.

Keeping Refugee Children and Teens Safe

Even as we cheer for George and Amal Clooney's commitment to schools for Syrian refugee children in Lebanon, let's remember the mental health needs of refugee children everywhere.

Just How Far Will a Narcissist Go to Hide Failure?

Experiencing failure is not an option for people high in narcissism. New research shows the lengths they'll go to so they can avoid confronting their weaknesses.

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