News

Move Over, Gray Matter—White Matter Is Taking Center Stage

By Christopher Bergland on October 17, 2017 in The Athlete's Way
One of the largest studies of white matter (which enables communication between brain regions) ever was published today by scientists from the University of Southern California.

Bromance Over Romance, Say Men in New Study

By Bella DePaulo Ph.D. on October 17, 2017 in Living Single
A study of 30 heterosexual university men found that they valued their bromances more than their romances in every way except one.

Stress Makes It Harder to Recognize Danger

By Lydia Denworth on October 16, 2017 in Brain Waves
Sometimes stress heightens our awareness, but more often, it dulls our ability to respond to new threats. Recognizing the risk and reducing sources of stress can help.

Why Do People Think Animals Make Good Therapists?

By Hal Herzog Ph.D. on October 16, 2017 in Animals and Us
Public interest in animal assisted therapy has grown by leaps and bounds. Yale University researchers examine the reason for its appeal.
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The Key to Forgiveness?

By Tim Cole Ph.D. on October 15, 2017 in Intimate Portrait
How easy is it to forgive a partner? The answer depends on how much you still believe that your partner cares and wants to do right by you.

The Science of Falling Out of Love

By Romeo Vitelli Ph.D. on October 15, 2017 in Media Spotlight
New research explores the thorny question of how to cope after a failed relationship and what it can mean for long-term emotional health.

Is Facebook Making You Depressed?

Long a concern of psychologists studying Facebook use, the possibility of users become depressed comes under scrutiny in newly published research.

What’s in a Name? A Lot, When It’s the Label for a Disease

By Linda Wasmer Andrews on October 13, 2017 in Minding the Body
The name given a disease may influence how successfully people cope with it, a recent study suggests. Are some common diseases due for rebranding?

Getting Sentimental Could Increase Your Savings

By Brad Klontz Psy.D., CFP on October 12, 2017 in Mind Over Money
How can we harness positive, emotionally charged memories to develop a deeper incentive for saving?

Harvey Weinstein Proves Sex Addiction Doesn't Exist

By Marty Klein Ph.D. on October 11, 2017 in Sexual Intelligence
Labelling Harvey Weinstein a "sex addict" allows us to confidently say "I'm not like that," rather than encouraging us to look at our own pain.

Don’t Just Blame Facebook for Fake News: It’s Us, Too

Is social media use a race to the bottom of our brainstems?

Why People Hold Grudges and What to Do About Them

When people hold grudges against you, it can be painful and confusing. New research shows there’s a reason they act this way. Understanding why may help you feel a bit better.

Synchronizing Brain Waves Can Turbocharge Executive Function

By Christopher Bergland on October 09, 2017 in The Athlete's Way
A pioneering new study has identified a surprising way to turbocharge executive functions. Someday, this method could be used to treat neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders.

Mental Accounting and Self-Control

By Art Markman Ph.D. on October 09, 2017 in Ulterior Motives
The 2017 Nobel Prize in Economics was awarded to Richard Thaler from the University of Chicago. His work explores strategies people use for making choices.

The Evidence on Reducing Gun Violence

As the nation reels from last week's shooting, some are calling for new laws while other want to protect gun-owners rights. But what does the data say about reducing gun violence?

Can Exercise Prevent Depression?

By Emily Deans M.D. on October 07, 2017 in Evolutionary Psychiatry
A large group of healthy individuals in Norway may have staved off depression with a small but regular amount of exercise. What does this tell us about how exercise might work?

2017 Nobel Literature Winner on Sycophancy

Ishiguro's brilliant portrait of the excruciating side of sycophantic self-nullification.

What Makes PTSD From Mass Killings and War Stand Out?

By Grant H. Brenner M.D. on October 05, 2017 in ExperiMentations
New research shows how chronic trauma affects civilian populations.

How Personality Changes in Teens

By Art Markman Ph.D. on October 05, 2017 in Ulterior Motives
A new study explores how traits shift and stabilize over time.

Mass Killings: An Evolutionary Perspective

By Robert J King Ph.D. on October 04, 2017 in Hive Mind
What insights does evolutionary psychology offer about mass killings? Some; but we are still a long way from complete understanding.

Black Tea Alters Gut Microbiome in Anti-Obesogenic Ways

By Christopher Bergland on October 04, 2017 in The Athlete's Way
Black tea alters gut microbiome in a way that promotes weight loss, according to a new UCLA study on mice.

Sex and Age Implicated in Autism-Related Diagnoses

Recent research reveals how sex and age are linked to other disorders which tend to co-occur with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

Why the Emotionally Intelligent May Earn More Money

Emotional intelligence is believed to link to greater success in life than general intelligence. New research shows there are indeed monetary advantages to having a higher EQ.

One Hour of Exercise Per Week Protects Against Depression

By Christopher Bergland on October 03, 2017 in The Athlete's Way
60 minutes of easy physical activity per week—without becoming breathless or sweating—can protect against future depression, according to a new landmark study.

How to Talk to Kids About the Las Vegas Shooting

It's hard to know how to explain the Las Vegas shooting to kids. Here are some tips for holding some tough conversations with children.

Examining Functional Activity in an Individual’s Brain

Neuroimaging studies show that specific brain regions work together to accomplish specific tasks. Methods to analyze data for individual people may lead to personalized treatments.

How Likely Are You to Be Scammed in Online Dating?

By Martin Graff Ph.D. on October 02, 2017 in Love, Digitally
Stories exist of victims parting with their life savings to obtain funds for the scammer. Better educated people more likely to be scammed.

Why Would Anyone Run For Office? It’s In Their Genes?

By Gregg R. Murray Ph.D. on October 01, 2017 in Caveman Politics
For the life of me I’ve never understood why someone would want to run for office. This may help explain it.

Tears of Connection

By Guest Blogger on October 01, 2017 in The Guest Room
Infant tears may play an underappreciated part in getting parents' attention.

3 Ways to Have Better Dreams

The ability to control dreams may seem like an impossible skill to acquire, but new research shows that even untrained individuals can become take charge over their night lives.

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