What Is Psychotherapy?

Psychotherapy is the practice of spending time with a trained therapist to help diagnose and treat mental and emotional problems. Therapy can take various forms—cognitive behavioral therapy, mindfulness-based cognitive therapy, psychodynamic therapy, or a combination of these—but at the center of each is the caring relationship between a mental health professional and a patient.

Recent posts on Therapy

How To Have Better Sex & Enhance Relationship Satisfaction

By Grant H. Brenner M.D. on October 23, 2017 in ExperiMentations
New research begins to tease apart how sexual and relationship satisfaction are distinct yet interrelated, describing ways to enhance both by communicating differently about each.

Psychotherapy in the Trump Era

The forces shaping our politics are also shaping our therapies.

A New Way to Understand the Narcissistic Male

Pathologically narcissistic men often engage in high-risk behavior, aggression, and substance abuse. New research focuses on their feelings of distress and need for treatment.
Fotolit2/Purchased from Deposit Photos

An Often Forgotten Approach to Helping You With Fear

By Pamela D. Garcy Ph.D. on October 20, 2017 in Fearless You
Are fearful fantasies scaring you? Revising what you imagine might help.

Roadblocks to Intimacy and Trust VII

Couples therapy teaches that there are at least six people in an intimate relationship.

People Don’t Still Lie on a Couch, Do They?

100 years since it was introduced by Freud, the couch still provokes both curiosity and ridicule. But does it work?

Get Your Teen Off the Phone

By Temma Ehrenfeld on October 19, 2017 in Open Gently
Therapy, sleep, exercise, and socializing in person may be more likely to help your depressed teen than an antidepressant.

If Your Therapist Harasses You: #MeToo

By Kimberly Key on October 17, 2017 in Counseling Keys
What happens when you've been sexually harassed and/or assaulted by your therapist?

3 Best and Worst Ways to Be a Friend When a Friend Needs You

A recent news article suggests that people need friends as well as lovers. When your friend’s relationship is in trouble, research shows what to do and not do as a confidant.

Why Do People Think Animals Make Good Therapists?

By Hal Herzog Ph.D. on October 16, 2017 in Animals and Us
Public interest in animal assisted therapy has grown by leaps and bounds. Yale University researchers examine the reason for its appeal.

Listening Patience

On several occasions, I have observed patients who seemed to be listening when I was talking to them, but left me doubtful about just how much they actually heard.

Sex Addiction Summer Camp or Toxic Masculinity?

By David J Ley Ph.D. on October 11, 2017 in Women Who Stray
Hollywood mogul Harvey Weinstein joins the long line of men who flee to sex addiction treatment in an effort to avoid or suppress sexual scandals.

Should Other Doctors Have Access to Your Psychiatry Note?

Should other doctors have access to your psychiatry note on the Electronic Health Record? It may improve physical wellness but your psychiatrist will have to adapt too.

How Helping Others Can Relieve Anxiety and Depression

By Seth J. Gillihan Ph.D. on October 10, 2017 in Think, Act, Be
A new study shows that thinking of others' well-being may be more beneficial than trying to boost our self-image.

6 Ways to Treat Anxiety and Depression from the Constitution

Identify and include the relevant marginalized parts of the self.

A New Way to Test Your Relationship's Health

Staying in a close relationship is always a matter of balancing its pros and cons. This new rating scale will help you pin down what’s working, or not, in yours.

The Great Paradox of Psychiatry

If the treatments for mental illness are better than ever, why is there more mental illness today than ever before? Herein lies the great paradox of psychiatry.

Do Children Really Need Psychiatric Medication?

By Marilyn Wedge Ph.D. on October 06, 2017 in Suffer the Children
Mental illness can be fatal. But in some cases, so can psychiatric medications.
Center for Jewish History, NYC/wikimediacommons

Artful Living

By Elizabeth Young on October 06, 2017 in Adaptations
I want to protect myself, in that way we do when we're reading a really good book and are afraid of what we suspect is going to happen.

What Makes PTSD From Mass Killings and War Stand Out?

By Grant H. Brenner M.D. on October 05, 2017 in ExperiMentations
New research shows how chronic trauma affects civilian populations.

An Open Letter to Therapists About Your Divorcing Clients

Therapists can do more harm than good if they don't know how to support divorcing clients

Depression and Mood Disorders

Most of us have learned to cope with mood swings but at any one time almost 10 percent of the U.S. adult population experience depression. Look for the signs and seek help.

How to Make Psychoanalysis Work Today

By John Munder Ross Ph.D. on October 02, 2017 in The Talking Cure
Psychoanalysis is an anachronism in today’s world—and often ineffective. Instead, patient and doctor must home in on those issues already in play in current reality.

Grieving for Las Vegas

By River Jordan on October 01, 2017 in Praying for Strangers
Just for one day let's all walk away from the wars and rhetoric, the killing and the evil.

The Importance of Cultural Immersion Programs

By Robert Dingman Ed.D. on September 29, 2017 in Mind Matters
Cultural immersion programs are important experiences for mental health professionals in training because they provide students an expanded perspective of global mental health.

Pitfalls of Not Being a Sexually Informed Therapist

By Joe Kort Ph.D. on September 29, 2017 in Understanding the Erotic Code
As therapists we know a lot about sexual pathology, but what about sexual pleasure?

Lose Sleep, Feel Better?

By Susan McQuillan M.S., RDN on September 29, 2017 in Cravings
Can sleep deprivation improve the symptoms of depression?

Want to Be a Therapist? 5 Signs You’d Be Great at It

Do you have these five personality traits?