All About Caregiving

In a 2004 national survey, the AARP found that 44.4 million Americans are providing unpaid care to an adult, and the estimated annual value is $257 billion. To do so is a beautiful act of love and devotion, but also a great drain on one's physical and psychological resources.

Recent posts on Caregiving

Ethical Issues in Treating Childhood Obesity

How do doctors decide when to recommend surgery for a child with obesity?

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights

By Grant H. Brenner M.D. on April 27, 2017 in ExperiMentations
What is the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and what does it mean?

Why Are Senior Citizens Using More Illicit Drugs?

Senior citizens are using and abusing substances at increasing rates.

Aging and Depression

By Roberta Satow Ph.D. on April 15, 2017 in Life After 50
Is getting old getting you down? Distinguishing between sadness and depression.

Disorganized Attachment: Fears That Go Unanswered

By Molly S. Castelloe Ph.D. on April 12, 2017 in The Me in We
How disorganized attachment in infancy impacts emotional and social development.

Can a Caregiver Be a (Benevolent) Dictator?

Can you override a patient's request if you know it's best for them?

Ambulatory Detox Modality Delivers Better Results

By Indra Cidambi, M.D. on April 06, 2017 in Sure Recovery
As America succumbs to an addiction epidemic avant-garde and cost-effective treatment program could help to dent the addiction curve.
Matthew Mendoza, used with permission

A Collection of Last Words

The many ways to say goodbye.
"Picking Grass at the Bus Stop"/Charlene Croft/CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

Who Speaks for Autism?

By Barb Cohen on March 31, 2017 in Mom, Am I Disabled?
I would not want someone else to speak for me; to decide what I want and what I need; to judge whether my life is worth living. But autism is a family affair. We all need a voice.

Goals of Hair

Do you want to be YOU, right up until the end?

The Woman Who Does it All

Women seem to hold up the world. Is this an identity, a self-created fate, or a default position when men in our lives do less than their share?

Dealing With Feelings

"Minimize affect inhibition... Maximize positive affects… Minimize negative affects.” — Silvan Tomkins

Top "Turning Straw Into Gold" Pieces from the Past 6 Years

I always celebrate my anniversary of writing for Psychology Today with a post that offers some of my past pieces for reading.
Carl Pickhardt Ph.D.

Adolescence and the Parental "No"

A parental "no" is a barrier to adolescent freedom. Parents have to decide when to keep the barrier up and when to let it down.

A Lost Opportunity for Mental Health Reform?

We don't let persons with Alzheimer’s leave the nursing home and wander the streets. Then, why do we allow persons with mental illness to refuse treatment and live under a bridge?

When Aging Parents Feel Like Giving Up—Now What?

The emotional price for caregiving can be high. But there are some things you can do to improve your energy and that of your loved one.

Photography Documenting Mental Illness Draws Criticism

Through her project, feelings of pain and hurt that Melissa held toward her mother were gone, and she found herself feeling greater empathy, acknowledging her mother's illness.

Nurture the Phoenix

By Toby Israel Ph.D. on March 07, 2017 in Design on My Mind
Can art + environment + psychology = a formula for our phoenix to rise from the ashes?

Can Empathy Heal?

By Julie K. Hersh on March 04, 2017 in Struck By Living
With one out of four people managing depression, chances are the person next to you can empathize and offer help.
Jessica Mendoza, used with permission

Touching the Dying

The comfort of touch.

Are You Suffering From Caregiver Fatigue or Burnout?

Do you have any time or energy left in the day to take care of YOU?

A Better Mousetrap: The Heart of Com-passion

By Gregg Levoy on February 27, 2017 in Passion!
Passion means "to suffer," and compassion means shared suffering. This story explores what's at the heart of compassion, and asks what we're willing to pay for it.
https://pixabay.com/en/love-loving-me-child-hope-prayer-1833162/

How to Develop Self-Compassion

By Diana Raab Ph.D. on February 26, 2017 in The Empowerment Diary
Self-compassion is a very important aspect of self-care. Many of us get wrapped up in caring for others and neglect ourselves. Sometimes writing can help us develop self-compassion

52 Ways to Show I Love You: Helping

By Roni Beth Tower Ph.D., ABPP on February 26, 2017 in Life, Refracted
Helping someone you love, through providing needed assistance, filling their request, assuming their task, or even taking care of yourself can enhance intimacy, respect, gratitude.
3Dman:shutterstock

So You Want to Be Happy? OK, But Consider This...

Research suggests that you should carefully evaluate your positive experiences. Those that you do not control can relate to negative outcomes.

Polite Doctors are Safer Doctors

Little things like polite communication and consistent use of basic safety habits can mean the difference between life and death medical care.

Unselfish Singles: They Give More Time, Money, and Care

By Bella DePaulo Ph.D. on February 24, 2017 in Living Single
Studies based on tens of thousands of participants show that the stereotype of the self-centered single person is exactly wrong. Singles are more giving than married people.

Caregiving and Complicated Family Dynamics

By Deborah J. Cohan, Ph.D. on February 12, 2017 in Social Lights
How to care for yourself amidst the chaos of caregiving.

52 Ways to Show I Love You: Giving

By Roni Beth Tower Ph.D., ABPP on February 12, 2017 in Life, Refracted
Give time, caring, and attention as well as gifts, experiences, and words.

Everything You Need to Know About Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

By Toni Bernhard J.D. on February 07, 2017 in Turning Straw Into Gold
"Lighting Up a Hidden World" is the most comprehensive guide to-date on Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, a little-understood illness that can have a devastating effect on people’s lives.